Reciprocity

Texas LTC Reciprocity

License-To-Carry (LTC) reciprocity agreement means the State of Texas and other state recognize each others LTC/CCW permits. A unilateral agreement means Texas honors that states LTC/CCW but that state does not recognize Texas LTCs. Not all states that a Texas LTC is allowed has a reciprocity agreement with Texas such as Vermont.

Click on the following link to get the most up to date list of states that honor Texas LTC:

http://www.dps.texas.gov/RSD/LTC/legal/reciprocity/

Visit the state reciprocity link above for the most up to date list of reciprocity agreements.The following link will display PDF files with handgun carrying information for each of the 50 US States.
http://www.handgunlaw.us/states/

Summary of Texas License-To-Cary LTC Laws

Texas is a shall-issue state with concealed weapons permits issued at the state level by the Texas Department of Public Safety.

No permits are required for legal rifles and shotguns.

There is no permit, background check, or firearms registration required when buying a handgun from a private individual. Moving to Texas from another state does not require a permit, background check, or firearms registration.

Open carry is only legal with a Texas LTC or a concealed carry license/permit from a state with reciprocity, provided the handgun is carried in a belt or shoulder belt holster. The minimum age is 21 years old or 18 years old for active-duty military.

Concealed carry is legal with a Texas LTC or a concealed carry license/permit from a state with reciprocity, and are issued to both residents and non-residents. They require a four- to six-hour training course as well as passing both a written exam and a shooting proficiency demonstration. Some areas are off-limits, including racetracks and secure areas of airports. In terms of reciprocity, Texas honors permits from states that meet specific criteria.

No permit or LTC are required to carry a handgun concealed in a personal vehicle. LTC restricted areas still apply.

Texas is a “stand your ground” and Castle Doctrine state. The law presumes you acted justifiably and reasonably if you use deadly force to protect yourself or another against an unlawful, forceful intrusion into your occupied habitation (where you sleep at night), vehicle, place of business, or employment; or to prevent an unlawful, forceful attempt to remove a lawful occupant from the occupied habitation, vehicle, place of business or employment; or to prevent certain serious felonies such as burglary or arson.

There is no duty to retreat if faced with a situation where you have to use force or deadly force to protect yourself or another.